Human rights

Joseph A. Ross

I am an educator, writer, public speaker, researcher, and historian. I show college students why the past is relevant to the present by teaching them historical thinking skills (sourcing, contextualizing, close reading, and corroborating).

My current research project examines the role of key American participants at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trial (1945-1946) in creating a human rights moment in the postwar period. My work combines international law, intellectual history, human rights, and historical memory.

Vanessa Walker

Vanessa Walker is the Joseph W. and Diane Zerbib Assistant Professor of History at Amherst College. She received a Ph.D. in US-International history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the recipient of several awards including a Graduate Fellowship at the Miller Center for Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, the Gerald R. Ford Scholar in Honor of Robert Teeter at the Ford Presidential Library, and a George Mosse Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Mark Philip Bradley

Mark Philip Bradley is the author of The World Reimagined: Americans and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge, 2016), Vietnam at War (Oxford, 2009), and Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam (UNC, 2000). He is the coeditor of Familiar Made Strange: American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn (Cornell, 2015), Making Sense of the Vietnam Wars (Oxford, 2008), and Truth Claims: Representation and Human Rights (Rutgers, 2001).

Lauren Frances Turek

Lauren Turek is an assistant professor of history at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX, where she teaches courses on modern United States history, U.S. foreign relations, public history, and American religion and politics. She earned her PhD in history from the University of Virginia. A diplomatic historian by training, she has research interests in the history of U.S. foreign relations, religion, and the international human rights movement.

Julia F. Irwin

Dr. Julia Irwin earned her Ph.D. in History from Yale University and is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of South Florida. An award-winning author, she has published widely on the place of humanitarian aid in 20th century U.S. foreign relations. Her book, Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation’s Humanitarian Awakening, is a history of U.S. international relief efforts during the First World War era. She is now writing a second book, Catastrophic Diplomacy: A History of U.S.

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