January 2017

Lauren Frances Turek

Lauren Turek is an assistant professor of history at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX, where she teaches courses on modern United States history, U.S. foreign relations, public history, and American religion and politics. She earned her PhD in history from the University of Virginia. A diplomatic historian by training, she has research interests in the history of U.S. foreign relations, religion, and the international human rights movement.

James R. Stocker

James Stocker is Assistant Professor of International Affairs at Trinity Washington University. He received his Ph.D. from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. He is the author of Spheres of Intervention: US Foreign Policy and the Collapse of Lebanon, 1967-1976 (Cornell University Press, 2016), as well as articles in the International History Review, the Journal of Cold War Studies, the Middle East Journal, Cold War History, and other publications.

Mark Philip Bradley

Mark Philip Bradley is the author of The World Reimagined: Americans and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge, 2016), Vietnam at War (Oxford, 2009), and Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam (UNC, 2000). He is the coeditor of Familiar Made Strange: American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn (Cornell, 2015), Making Sense of the Vietnam Wars (Oxford, 2008), and Truth Claims: Representation and Human Rights (Rutgers, 2001).

Mara Drogan

I received my PhD with distinction in International, Comparative, and Global History from the State University of New York at Albany. I am currently working on a book manuscript entitled "The New Atomic Diplomacy: Atoms for Peace and the Globalization of Nuclear Technology," which examines the Eisenhower Administration’s plan to share civilian nuclear technology with nations worldwide. Using case studies of US relations with nations in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America, I show that Atoms for Peace marked an important shift in US foreign policy in the mid-1950s.

David C. Engerman

David Engerman received his Ph.D. in American and Russian History from the University of California-Berkeley in 1998 and has been teaching at Brandeis University (and a Research Associate at Harvard's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies) ever since. His first two books examined American-Russian/Soviet relations and mutual (mis-)understandings. He has just completed a project on economic aid in the Cold War.

Benjamin R. Young

I graduated with an MA in history from SUNY Brockport in August 2013 where I wrote my master's thesis on the alliance formed between the Black Panther Party and the North Korean leadership in the late 1960s and early 1970s. I am currently a PhD candidate in modern Korean history at The George Washington University where I'm writing my dissertation on North Korean involvement in the Third World during the Cold War era. I have formally studied the Korean language in the United States, South Korea, and in the ethnic Korean region of China.

Tim Borstelmann

Thomas (“Tim”) Borstelmann is the Elwood N. and Katherine Thompson Distinguished Professor of Modern World History. Previously, he taught for twelve years at Cornell University. Borstelmann holds a B.A. from Stanford University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University. His first book, Apartheid’s Reluctant Uncle: The United States and Southern Africa in the Early Cold War won the Stuart Bernath Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.

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