January 2017

Amy L. Sayward

Amy Sayward is a scholar of the United Nations with special emphasis on the agencies promoting international development in the postwar period, having published two books in this area. Her other two books deal with Tennessee history and the death penalty.

Julia F. Irwin

Dr. Julia Irwin earned her Ph.D. in History from Yale University and is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of South Florida. An award-winning author, she has published widely on the place of humanitarian aid in 20th century U.S. foreign relations. Her book, Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation’s Humanitarian Awakening, is a history of U.S. international relief efforts during the First World War era. She is now writing a second book, Catastrophic Diplomacy: A History of U.S.

Jayita Sarkar

Jayita Sarkar is a Research Fellow with the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From the fall of 2017, she will be an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University’s Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies. Dr. Sarkar's research projects have been funded by the Stanton Foundation, Harvard University's Project on Managing the Atom, Swiss National Science Foundation, Lyndon Johnson Foundation and Gerald Ford Foundation.

Christopher McKnight Nichols

Nichols teaches history at Oregon State University, where is serves as Director of the OSU Center for the Humanities. He specializes in the history of the United States and its relationship to the rest of the world, particularly in the areas of isolationism, internationalism, and globalization. In addition, he is an expert on modern U.S. intellectual, cultural, and political history, with an emphasis on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (1880-1920) through the present. A frequent commentator on U.S.

David C. Atkinson

Atkinson's recently published book, The Burdens of White Supremacy: Containing Asian Labor Migration in the British Empire and the United States draws upon archival research in Australia, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand, and the United States. It explores efforts to restrict Japanese and South Asian immigration during the first decades of the twentieth century.

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