January 2017

Mark Philip Bradley

Mark Philip Bradley is the author of The World Reimagined: Americans and Human Rights in the Twentieth Century (Cambridge, 2016), Vietnam at War (Oxford, 2009), and Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam (UNC, 2000). He is the coeditor of Familiar Made Strange: American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn (Cornell, 2015), Making Sense of the Vietnam Wars (Oxford, 2008), and Truth Claims: Representation and Human Rights (Rutgers, 2001).

Mara Drogan

I received my PhD with distinction in International, Comparative, and Global History from the State University of New York at Albany. I am currently working on a book manuscript entitled "The New Atomic Diplomacy: Atoms for Peace and the Globalization of Nuclear Technology," which examines the Eisenhower Administration’s plan to share civilian nuclear technology with nations worldwide. Using case studies of US relations with nations in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America, I show that Atoms for Peace marked an important shift in US foreign policy in the mid-1950s.

David C. Engerman

David Engerman received his Ph.D. in American and Russian History from the University of California-Berkeley in 1998 and has been teaching at Brandeis University (and a Research Associate at Harvard's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies) ever since. His first two books examined American-Russian/Soviet relations and mutual (mis-)understandings. He has just completed a project on economic aid in the Cold War.

Benjamin R. Young

I graduated with an MA in history from SUNY Brockport in August 2013 where I wrote my master's thesis on the alliance formed between the Black Panther Party and the North Korean leadership in the late 1960s and early 1970s. I am currently a PhD candidate in modern Korean history at The George Washington University where I'm writing my dissertation on North Korean involvement in the Third World during the Cold War era. I have formally studied the Korean language in the United States, South Korea, and in the ethnic Korean region of China.

Tim Borstelmann

Thomas (“Tim”) Borstelmann is the Elwood N. and Katherine Thompson Distinguished Professor of Modern World History. Previously, he taught for twelve years at Cornell University. Borstelmann holds a B.A. from Stanford University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Duke University. His first book, Apartheid’s Reluctant Uncle: The United States and Southern Africa in the Early Cold War won the Stuart Bernath Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.

Sean Fear

Sean Fear received his PhD in History from Cornell University in August 2016. His book manuscript, "Theatres of Diplomacy: Domestic Politics and Civil Society in US-South Vietnamese Relations, 1967-1971," examines the impact on US-Vietnamese relations of domestic politics in both South Vietnam and the United States. Sean has conducted research at archives in Vietnam and the United States. He also draws heavily on Vietnamese-language memoirs, blogs, and print media.

Mary L. Dudziak

Mary L. Dudziak is a leading American legal historian and President of SHAFR. She writes and teaches about the history of war’s impact on American law and politics, civil rights history and constitutional law. Her books include War·Time: An Idea, Its History, Its Consequences (2012); Exporting American Dreams: Thurgood Marshall’s African Journey (2008); Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy (2000, 2nd ed. 2011); and two edited collections. Her op-eds have appeared in the New York Times and elsewhere.

Richard H. Immerman

Richard H. Immerman is Edward Buthusiem Distinguished Faculty Fellow in History and Marvin Wachman Director of the Center for the Study of Force and Diplomacy at Temple University. The recipient of Temple’s Paul Eberman Faculty Research Award, the University of Hawaii’s Board of Regents Excellence in Research Award, and a former president of the Society of Historians of American Foreign Relations, his most recent books are Empire for Liberty; The Hidden Hand; and Understanding the U.S. Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Stephen Macekura

Stephen Macekura is Assistant Professor of International Studies in the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University. Stephen received his Ph.D. in History from the University of Virginia in 2013. He has held post-doctoral fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia and the Dickey Center for International Understanding at Dartmouth of College. His first book, Of Limits and Growth: The Rise of Global Sustainable Development in the Twentieth Century, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2015.

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