January 2017

Julia F. Irwin

Dr. Julia Irwin earned her Ph.D. in History from Yale University and is currently an Associate Professor of History at the University of South Florida. An award-winning author, she has published widely on the place of humanitarian aid in 20th century U.S. foreign relations. Her book, Making the World Safe: The American Red Cross and a Nation’s Humanitarian Awakening, is a history of U.S. international relief efforts during the First World War era. She is now writing a second book, Catastrophic Diplomacy: A History of U.S.

Jayita Sarkar

Jayita Sarkar is a Research Fellow with the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From the fall of 2017, she will be an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University’s Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies. Dr. Sarkar's research projects have been funded by the Stanton Foundation, Harvard University's Project on Managing the Atom, Swiss National Science Foundation, Lyndon Johnson Foundation and Gerald Ford Foundation.

Christopher McKnight Nichols

Nichols teaches history at Oregon State University, where is serves as Director of the OSU Center for the Humanities. He specializes in the history of the United States and its relationship to the rest of the world, particularly in the areas of isolationism, internationalism, and globalization. In addition, he is an expert on modern U.S. intellectual, cultural, and political history, with an emphasis on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (1880-1920) through the present. A frequent commentator on U.S.

David C. Atkinson

Atkinson's recently published book, The Burdens of White Supremacy: Containing Asian Labor Migration in the British Empire and the United States draws upon archival research in Australia, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand, and the United States. It explores efforts to restrict Japanese and South Asian immigration during the first decades of the twentieth century.

Hal Marc Friedman

Hal M. Friedman is Associate Chair of History and Professor of Modern History at Henry Ford College, Dearborn, Michigan. He has published a trilogy on US national security policy in the immediate postwar Pacific and is currently completing another trilogy on the transition of the US Naval War College from the Pacific War to the Cold War in the Pacific in the same time period. He is also a Graduate Senior Instructor in Norwich University's online Master of Arts in History Program, an Adjunct Lecturer of Strategy and Policy in the U.S.

Patrick Michael Kirkwood

A Belfast-born Scot. Ph.D. from Central Michigan University in Imperial History (2016). Faculty Member @ MCC-Blue River, where I teach US and World history. I write on inter-imperial exchanges focused on the American and British empires in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. So far I've been published in the Michigan Historical Review, Civil War History, and the Journal of World History.

Maurice Jr. Marc Labelle

Dr. Maurice Jr. M. Labelle specializes in the interconnected histories of Arab decolonization, postcolonialism, and US-Middle East Relations. More specifically, he is most interested in historicizing the Palestinian-American public intellectual Edward Said, his political activism, as well as his influential anti-imperial critique of the United States--most famously outlined in his seminal 1978 book, Orientalism. Dr.

Pages